When a friend suggested we meet up and take the kids to Legoland, I was all for it. He had cereal box vouchers which enabled us to get Monkey in for free with two-paying adults… but the problem was hubby wasn’t around on the weekend and Monkey was already free because of his age. So, after a some confusion, I ended up missing the deadline to get discounted tickets online, and had to pay the full admission price… £46.80. Yep, that much.

Before I even got to the theme park my hackles were raised. It didn’t help matters when my dear mum also told me she had free vouchers through her clubcard, after I had already purchased my ticket online.

It also didn’t please me that I had to pay an extra £4 to park my car there. Seriously? I mean where else are all the thousands of visitors who come by car going to park?

IMG_0012_2The day wasn’t shaping up to be a good one… Monkey was super excited, but when we woke up on dreary Saturday morning, with rain lashing at the window, the thought of wandering around wet and miserable did not fill me with joy. In fact, I even tried to get out of it, but with my friend’s bullying encouragement, and the fact that I had already paid the entrance and packed up our stuff, the two of us set off on our mummy/Monkey day.

It was still raining heavily when we arrived, but by the time we got through the turnstiles the sun just starting peeking through the clouds – things were already beginning to look a lot brighter.

Legoland Windsor Resort is a theme park dedicated to children from 2-12 years old. It’s massive: with over 55 interactive rides, live shows, building workshops, driving schools and attractions, all set in 150 acres of parkland.IMG_0028_2

The resort map was quite daunting. We didn’t know where to begin. Luckily, my friend M came to meet us and we immediately boarded the Hill Train to take us right into the heart of the park.

Legoland is made up of several different sections all with varying themes including the Land of the Vikings, Pirates Shores and Kingdom of the Pharaohs. Several rides and attractions have height restrictions and they are pretty stringent on this rule, as Monkey found to his disappointment when he wasn’t allowed on the Sky Rider after queuing for over 20 minutes. He just missed out by a millimetre, and let’s put it this way, he took it a lot better than his mum…IMG_0011_2

However, we soon made up for it with all the other fun things he got to do. His particular favourites of the day were:

Digger Challenge

Monkey’s face lit up like all his Christmases had come at once when he say a circle of Diggers in front of him. I was terrible at the controls and shame of shame had to have a man come and guide me, while Monkey was shouting: ‘Get the balls, mummy! Get the balls!’IMG_0008_2

Miniland

As I am sure most young boys are, Monkey is hooked on locomotives, automobiles and aircrafts and there are plenty in Miniland. We were both fascinated by the lego reconstructions of famous landmarks from England and the USA . Over 40million lego bricks were used to build all of the structures. Amazing stuff. I could barely prise him away.IMG_0014_2IMG_0015_2

DUPLO Valley Splash and Play

This was the one section we spent most of our time in. Not only did it have several rides that Monkey adored – such as the Fairy Tale Brook, which consisted of a boat ride that went through the magical fairytales – so fitting as he’s recently begun enjoying the classic stories Goldilocks and the Three Bears and Hansel and Gretel, there’s also the Duplo helicopter ride and train ride, which Monkey went on several times.IMG_0020_2

IMG_0024_2Then the kids had a wonderful time splashing around in Europe’s largest water play structure with drench towers and water sprays. Amazingly, the weather had done a complete U-turn and it hit over 30 degrees, not good when I actually took out the sun cream from our bag because I thought we wouldn’t need it!FotorCreated

Monkey also enjoyed his time in the Duplo playground with an assortment of climbing frames, tunnels and slides.

We also took some lunch in Lego City, where the majority of restaurants were situated. We opted for the Pizza and Pasta buffet, which was doing brisk business. Admittedly, I wasn’t so sure at first, but the food was actually quite decent, with free re-fills and lots of pizza choices. Not so great on the salads stuff which looked a bit dry. At £12 per adult, it wasn’t the cheapest, but you could go up as many times as you wanted.IMG_0009_2

By the time we had managed to queue up and enjoy all the delights mentioned above, I was shocked at how quickly the time went. We hadn’t even ventured to the top of the park – which in fairness has rides more suited to older children.

By this point Monkey was exhausted and it was time for us to get going, but it was unfortunate that I didn’t actually get my money’s worth – some of the queues for the under-3 rides were phenomenal.. In all seriousness, I think you would need a full two days to be able to see and do everything at Legoland.IMG_0013_2

The crowds began to get a bit trying after a while, so we were both ready to go. I am pretty certain we will be going back at some point, but next time I will make sure I have a plan of action as to where to take Monkey and in which areas, rather than wandering around aimlessly which will hopefully make better use of our time and protract the enjoyment for all of us.IMG_0027_2

Legoland is a children’s paradise. But if you have toddlers under three, here is a guide to what rides are suitable and in which sections:

The Beginning:

LEGO® Star Wars™ Miniland Model Display & LEGO® Star Wars™ Gallery
Hill Train

Land of the Vikings:

Loki’s Labyrinth

Pirate Shores:

Castaway Camp
Enchanted Forest

Kingdom of the Pharaohs:

Laser Raiders
Desert Chase
Aero Nomad

DUPLO® Valley Splash and Play:

Splash Safari
Brickville
Fairy Tale Brook
DUPLO Train

LEGO® City:

X-box 360® Gaming Zone
Orient Expedition
Pirates of Skeleton Bay Stunt Show

 Imagination Centre:

Imagination Theatre

Adventure Land:

Atlantis Submarine Voyage

Traffic:

Boating School
Balloon School